A missed step, a cracked sidewalk, a patch of ice you do not see...and all of a sudden you have a wrist fracture.  You will have a lot of questions, but the biggest one will be - do I need surgery?

Wrist fractures are among the most common orthopaedic injuries in the Unites States.
Typical symptoms include severe pain, usually intensifying with use, swelling, tenderness, bruising, deformity and numbness or stiffness in the hand.
Treatment for a wrist fracture begins with a diagnosis. Your doctor will perform a physical exam and most likely order an x-ray to get more information about your injury.  The good news is that surgery is not always needed. For simple wrist fractures, in which the bones have not fragmented or shifted out of position, a splint or cast is often recommended.
However, for more severe injuries, in which the bones have shifted or become unstable, or if there is any additional wrist joint injury, a surgical approach may be your best treatment option. In this case, either a small plate and screws or several pins can be used to secure the bones in the correct position while healing occurs.
Dr. Kevin Lutsky of the Rothman Institute in Egg Harbor Township tells us what to expect if you need wrist surgery.