A man from the city of Cape May was among those arrested Wednesday during the attack on the U.S. Capitol after he says he traveled to Washington D.C. to spread the word of God.

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According to the United States Capitol Police, Leonard Guthrie was arrested for unlawful entry as he climbed the Capitol steps shortly before 2pm Wednesday.

Guthrie described himself as a preacher when talking with a reporter from Fox 29 News on Thursday. He admitted to breaking the law by entering the Capitol building grounds, but insists he didn't take part in any violence.

"I'm not a violent person....I walked up to the Capitol because that’s where voices needed to be heard. This was more than a rally. This was America - people coming from all over American to be heard."

Guthrie, a 48-year old Trump supporter, says he doesn't think the president was responsible for inciting the violence at the Capitol. But chaos erupted Wednesday afternoon, as a Trump rally broke into unrest and insurrection, and left the country shaken and the nation's capital on alert.

"It wasn't about hurting anybody...all the trump supporters I've ever met support the police."

Thursday evening, a Capitol Hill police officer who was assaulted during Wednesday's riot died. The pro-Trump extremists attacked police "with metal pipes, discharged chemical irritants, and took up other weapons against our officers," U.S. Capitol Police said Thursday.

In all, 70 people were arrested on charges related to unrest from the protest and Capitol attack Washington's Metropolitan Police Department said. Most of those arrests were for violating curfew, with many, such as Guthrie, facing charges of unlawful entry.

NPR reports that one person was said to have been carrying a semiautomatic rifle and 11 Molotov cocktails upon arrest.

Leonard Guthrie drew the line with those who entered the Capitol building. "Nobody should have died there. The people who went into the building were wrong," Guthrie told FOX 29's Jeff Cole.

Sources: Fox 29/NPR

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