A Vineland man who says he was carelessly served a cup of hot coffee at a Dunkin' drive-thru that burned him severely has filed a lawsuit against the franchise owner and an employee.

In the complaint filed in Superior Court in Cumberland County, Leonard Allen says he suffered second-degree burns in the thigh and groin area because the server "failed to properly secure the cup and lid of the beverage" at the restaurant on Chestnut Street in Vineland.

Allen said he has had to endure "great pain and suffering" and will have to "expend great sums of money" for medical treatment

"He has been prevented from attending to his normal business and affairs, and has suffered various other economic and noneconomic damages," according to the complaint.

Allen seeks compensation for his medical treatment and court costs.

"At Dunkin’, the safety and well-being of our guests is a priority," company spokeswoman Laura Wanerka told New Jersey 101.5. "While we are not able to comment on pending litigation against a franchisee, we can confirm Dunkin’ is not named as a defendant in this case."

Lids and hot beverages have led to lawsuits against both Dunkin' and Wawa over the past few years.

In 2014, a woman sued Dunkin' because the lid of her cup of hot sea served at a Ramsey store popped off, spilling the tea "served at a temperature not intended for human consumption."

A Somerset woman settled her lawsuit against Dunkin' for $522,000 in 2015 after suffering burns on her face and neck when she tripped over an exposed curb stop in the parking lot.

The parents of a 3-year-old girl who was severely burned by a spilled hot cup of coffee at a Neptune City Wawa filed a federal lawsuit in 2018 claiming the temperature was too hot.

Contact reporter Dan Alexander at Dan.Alexander@townsquaremedia.com or via Twitter @DanAlexanderNJ

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