Two people from Cape May County are facing a long list of drug-related charges following a traffic stop in Wildwood this past weekend.

The Wildwood Police Department says their officers conducted a suspicious motor vehicle stop near the intersection of Youngs and Pacific Avenues just before 9:00 Saturday night, January 27th.

Two people inside the vehicle, 38-year-old Jason Popplewell of Villas and 39-year-old Kelly Phillips of Wildwood, "were detained after Detectives observed both occupants engage in suspected narcotics activity, a few minutes earlier, at an undisclosed location," according to authorities.

A police K9 "revealed a positive odor of narcotics inside the stopped vehicle" and police then allegedly found distribution quantities of suspected cocaine, methamphetamine, and a scale inside of the vehicle.

Charges Filed

Popplewell and Phillips were taken into custody and charged with the following:

  • Second-degree possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine within 500 feet of a public place
  • Second-degree possession with intent to distribute cocaine within 500 feet of a public place
  • Second-degree possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine
  • Third-degree possession with intent to distribute cocaine
  • Third-degree possession of methamphetamine
  • Third-degree possession of cocaine
  • Third-degree possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine within 1000 feet of school property
  • Disorderly persons offenses of possession of prescription legend drugs and failure to turn over narcotics to law enforcement

Phillips was released on a summons complaint while Popplewell was incarcerated at the Cape May County Correctional Center in accordance with state bail reform guidelines.

The public is reminded that charges are accusations and all persons are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

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