Singer Mary J. Blige was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last year. She’s won nine Grammy Awards, been nominated for Oscars, and sold over 100 million records.

Yet real estate deals have not been kind to her.

In 2008, she purchased a 13,000-square-foot mansion in Saddle River. She spent a decade on and off trying to sell it and it finally sold in 2020 for $5.5 million, an almost $7 million loss.

Then there’s this one.

She still owns a home in Cresskill. It’s another mansion, with more than 7,000 square feet. The description sounds amazing: six bedrooms, eight full bathrooms, two half baths, three fireplaces. Guest quarters. Has its own gym.

But no one wants it.

It’s been for sale for two and a half years. No takers. Why? Well, tell me if you’d be suspicious about a property advertised where none of the photos show the inside of the home. Take a look.

On Zillow.com there’s this sole picture of the home’s exterior.

MLS via Zillow
MLS via Zillow
loading...

Here’s everything that follows.

NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
loading...
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
loading...
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
loading...
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
loading...
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
loading...
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
NJMLS via Zillow/Townsquare Media illustration
loading...

Yes, only pics to show that the house is indeed in Cresskill. Word has it Mary J. Blige’s home has fallen into disrepair. Something you always suspect when the seller doesn’t want to show you pictures. But not what you’d expect from a property for which they are asking $3 million.

The craziest thing is it first went on the market in the summer of 2019 for an ask of $2.25 million. Then in mid-2021, with no takers, she raised the price to $2.75 million. Again no takers. By October the price was again increased to $3 million where it remains today.

Not sure she’s understanding the supply and demand concept.

 

Check out the most expensive home for sale in Somerset County

LOOK: Food history from the year you were born

From product innovations to major recalls, Stacker researched what happened in food history every year since 1921, according to news and government sources.
 

New Jersey's smallest towns by population

New Jersey's least populated municipalities, according to the 2020 Census. This list excludes Pine Valley, which would have been the third-smallest with 21 residents but voted to merge into Pine Hill at the start of 2022.