42 other states have this traffic law on the books. New Jersey is not one of them, but soon we could be the 43rd state. Break this law and it could cost you.

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The 'Safe Passing Bill' was approved by the Senate earlier in the week and now all it needs is the signature of Governor Phil Murphy.

The Safe Passing Bill would be very similar to the 'Move Over' law that requires motorists to make room for or pullover for police, fire, ambulances, and EMTs on the road.

Drivers would be required by law to move over one lane when passing those on bicycles, scooters, and even pedestrians. If moving over one lane is not safe, motorists will be required to slow down to 25 mph. It would require drivers to move over one lane when passing. You will not be required to move over if bicycle and scooter riders are on a sidewalk. The same goes for pedestrians. The only exception is if there isn't a sidewalk for pedestrians to use, you must move over or slow down.

Failure to comply could cost you. If summonsed you would face a $100 fine. If your vehicle causes an injury, the fine goes up to $500, and two points are added to your license.

As reported by NJ.com. Debra Kagan, Executive Director of the NJ Bike and Walk Coalition testified that New Jersey has had a "boom" in cyclists, those on scooters walkers using the road.

If you think pedestrian injuries and fatalities aren't a problem in New Jersey, think again. New Jersey had the eighth highest number of pedestrian deaths in the country in 2020.

While I hope this law is passed, it's important that pedestrians and those on bicycles and scooters are responsible and safe as well. In order for everyone to stay safe, it requires effort on everyone's part.

That being said, I'm still on the fence on whether this law is for safety, or whether it's another money grab for the state. Time will tell.

Let's bike to the beach! LOOK: Here are the 50 best beach towns in America

Every beach town has its share of pluses and minuses, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best one to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, that compares U.S. beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The cities ranged in population from 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From those rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will be unsurprised to learn that many of towns featured here are in one of those two states.

Keep reading to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.

LOOK: Here is the richest town in each state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, luxury cars, and ritzy restaurants. Read on to see which town in your home state took the title of the richest location and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows—your hometown might even be on this list.