If you haven't read the fine print on your cable bill recently, you might be surprised to learn that Comcast/Xfinity will be charging you more if you use too much internet data each month.

According to Comcast, as of this month, "Xfinity Internet now comes with 1.2 Terabytes (1,229 GB) of Internet Data in a month."

So, if you think you have "unlimited" data at home because you haven't had to pay more in the past, think again.

Here's how it will all play-out: in January and February, you'll receive a "complimentary credit" if you use more than 1.2 TB of data. In March, you'll receive a "one-time courtesy credit" should you hit that level. Beginning in April, "if you go over again, data will be added in 50 GB increments ($10 each) to your account. You won't be charged more than $100 in a month."

But exactly how much data is 1.2 terabytes? They say only five percent of their customers ever hit that level. The folks at Comcast say you would need to watch hundreds of hours of TV shows in high definition or do thousands of hours of live video chatting to reach 1.2 TB/month.

Everyone's favorite cable company is quick to mention that unlimited plans are available and, as always, log into your account for a full analysis of how much data you are actually using each month.

According to an article on patch.com, Comcast has had data caps like this in place for a number of years in states like Texas, Florida, and California, but now they are being rolled-out nationwide.

And as word of the cap spreads, lawmakers in various states are taking notice. In Massachusetts, for example, nearly 70 lawmakers wrote a letter to the cable giant urging them to drop the plan. The letter stated, "We strongly urge Comcast to discontinue this plan, and to reconsider any future attempts at imposing a data cap or any perversion of the principles of net neutrality in Massachusetts," according to WCVB-TV.

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